Aspirus Health and Performance Center to Provide Free Blood … – Aspirus


(Antigo, WI) – The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that about one out of every three American adults have high blood pressure, or hypertension. 

“Because high blood pressure is so common, it might be tempting to assume that it’s no big deal. But the truth is, that when left untreated, high blood pressure can put you at risk for potentially life-threatening complications,” said Greg Renfro, Manager, Aspirus Health & Performance Center in Antigo.

In celebration of American Heart Month, Aspirus Health and Performance Center will be offering free blood pressure screenings February 1-15, Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. These screenings are offered on a walk-in basis at the Aspirus Health and Performance Center located on the Campus of Aspirus Langlade Hospital and Clinic. 

“High blood pressure is the No. 1 cause for heart attack and stroke,” adds Renfro.” “The good news is that there’s much you can do to help manage your blood pressure.”

Here are 9 tips Renfro suggests from the American Heart Association. 

1. KNOW YOUR NUMBERS
Normal blood pressure is 120/80 or below. Anything over that is considered high and brings an increased risk for heart disease and stroke. If you’ve been diagnosed with high blood pressure, your healthcare provider can tell you your personal target blood pressure level.

2. TAKE YOUR MEDICATION AS PRESCRIBED
Has your doctor prescribed high blood pressure medication for you? Take it exactly as ordered. And don’t stop taking it unless your doctor tells you to.

3. BE CAREFUL WHEN TAKING OVER THE COUNTER (OTC) MEDICINES
Read their labels. Many OTC medicines—like ibuprofen and decongestants—can raise your blood pressure. Talk to your doctor about medicines that won’t raise your blood pressure.

4. KEEP A HEALTHY WEIGHT
Aim for a body mass index between 18.5 and 24.9. If you’re overweight, losing as little as 5 to 10 pounds could help lower your blood pressure.

5. EAT NUTRITIOUSLY
Eat plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Choose low-fat dairy products and lean meats and reduce saturated and total fat in your diet.

6. REDUCE SODIUM INTAKE
One teaspoon of salt contains about 2,300 mg of sodium. That’s the upper limit of what the AHA recommends for daily intake. Ideally, you should limit salt to 1,500 mg per day. Avoiding prepackaged, processed and prepared foods is a great way to reduce your sodium intake.

7. EXERCISE
Aim for at least 150 minutes of moderately intense physical activity per week. Brisk walking counts. Make it simple by scheduling 30 minutes of activity at least five days a week. Exercise is safe for almost everyone, and the benefits outweigh any risks. Ease in to exercise if you haven’t been active for a while. And talk to your doctor if you have a preexisting condition, like heart disease.  Call the Aspirus Health and Performance Center at 715.623.9924 for help with an exercise program designed specifically for you.

8. KNOW THE RISKS OF ALCOHOL
Avoid excessive use of alcohol. If you don’t drink, don’t start.

9. DON’T SMOKE
Nicotine can raise your blood pressure, and both tobacco products and vaping products have it. If you don’t smoke, don’t start. If you do smoke, ask your doctor for help quitting.

In addition, here are some of the other risks of uncontrolled blood pressure: 
1. It can cause kidney damage. 
2. You are more likely to develop vision problems. 
3. You could develop sexual dysfunction. 
4. It raises your risk for peripheral artery disease. 
5. You have a higher risk of hypertensive crisis.

A hypertensive crisis is a medical emergency that causes your blood pressure to rise above 180/120 rapidly. If your blood pressure gets too high, it can cause damage to your organs and other potentially life-threatening complications. Symptoms of a hypertensive crisis include:
-Blurry vision or other vision problems
-Dizziness or Lightheadedness
-Severe headaches
-Nosebleed
-Shortness of breath
-Chest discomfort or pain
-A feeling of anxiety or that something is not right

If you have any of these symptoms, call 911 or visit the nearest hospital emergency department right away.

(Antigo, WI) – The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that about one out of every three American adults have high blood pressure, or hypertension. 

“Because high blood pressure is so common, it might be tempting to assume that it’s no big deal. But the truth is, that when left untreated, high blood pressure can put you at risk for potentially life-threatening complications,” said Greg Renfro, Manager, Aspirus Health & Performance Center in Antigo.

In celebration of American Heart Month, Aspirus Health and Performance Center will be offering free blood pressure screenings February 1-15, Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. These screenings are offered on a walk-in basis at the Aspirus Health and Performance Center located on the Campus of Aspirus Langlade Hospital and Clinic. 

“High blood pressure is the No. 1 cause for heart attack and stroke,” adds Renfro.” “The good news is that there’s much you can do to help manage your blood pressure.”

Here are 9 tips Renfro suggests from the American Heart Association. 

1. KNOW YOUR NUMBERS
Normal blood pressure is 120/80 or below. Anything over that is considered high and brings an increased risk for heart disease and stroke. If you’ve been diagnosed with high blood pressure, your healthcare provider can tell you your personal target blood pressure level.

2. TAKE YOUR MEDICATION AS PRESCRIBED
Has your doctor prescribed high blood pressure medication for you? Take it exactly as ordered. And don’t stop taking it unless your doctor tells you to.

3. BE CAREFUL WHEN TAKING OVER THE COUNTER (OTC) MEDICINES
Read their labels. Many OTC medicines—like ibuprofen and decongestants—can raise your blood pressure. Talk to your doctor about medicines that won’t raise your blood pressure.

4. KEEP A HEALTHY WEIGHT
Aim for a body mass index between 18.5 and 24.9. If you’re overweight, losing as little as 5 to 10 pounds could help lower your blood pressure.

5. EAT NUTRITIOUSLY
Eat plenty of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Choose low-fat dairy products and lean meats and reduce saturated and total fat in your diet.

6. REDUCE SODIUM INTAKE
One teaspoon of salt contains about 2,300 mg of sodium. That’s the upper limit of what the AHA recommends for daily intake. Ideally, you should limit salt to 1,500 mg per day. Avoiding prepackaged, processed and prepared foods is a great way to reduce your sodium intake.

7. EXERCISE
Aim for at least 150 minutes of moderately intense physical activity per week. Brisk walking counts. Make it simple by scheduling 30 minutes of activity at least five days a week. Exercise is safe for almost everyone, and the benefits outweigh any risks. Ease in to exercise if you haven’t been active for a while. And talk to your doctor if you have a preexisting condition, like heart disease.  Call the Aspirus Health and Performance Center at 715.623.9924 for help with an exercise program designed specifically for you.

8. KNOW THE RISKS OF ALCOHOL
Avoid excessive use of alcohol. If you don’t drink, don’t start.

9. DON’T SMOKE
Nicotine can raise your blood pressure, and both tobacco products and vaping products have it. If you don’t smoke, don’t start. If you do smoke, ask your doctor for help quitting.

In addition, here are some of the other risks of uncontrolled blood pressure: 
1. It can cause kidney damage. 
2. You are more likely to develop vision problems. 
3. You could develop sexual dysfunction. 
4. It raises your risk for peripheral artery disease. 
5. You have a higher risk of hypertensive crisis.
A hypertensive crisis is a medical emergency that causes your blood pressure to rise above 180/120 rapidly. If your blood pressure gets too high, it can cause damage to your organs and other potentially life-threatening complications. Symptoms of a hypertensive crisis include:
-Blurry vision or other vision problems
-Dizziness or Lightheadedness
-Severe headaches
-Nosebleed
-Shortness of breath
-Chest discomfort or pain
-A feeling of anxiety or that something is not right

If you have any of these symptoms, call 911 or visit the nearest hospital emergency department right away.

© 2023 Aspirus, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

source


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.