New Way Of Slowing Kids’ Myopia Progress – Moms


If children unknowingly struggle with their eyesight, it can cause them issues in school, and with developmental skills, like reading.
A new study has found a possible way to slow down the progression of myopia in children. Myopia is a term that is being heard more now due to an increased number of children presenting with it. This increase is being blamed on screen time, especially during the pandemic when children were completing their school online more.
Eye health in children should be taken just as seriously as physical and mental health, but it can often be overlooked. It is important that parents take their children to the eye doctor for annual screenings to make sure their eye health is optimal.
If children unknowingly struggle with their eyesight, it can cause them issues in school, and with developmental skills, like reading. According to UPI, a new study is suggesting a new way to slow down the worsening of myopia, which is also known as ‘nearsightedness.’
RELATED: What Is The Increasing Eye Condition Myopia In Children?
This study was published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology, and it can be read in full here. The treatment is a metabolite of caffeine, and while it is still being studied for its safety and effectiveness, it is showing some real progress.
This caffeine metabolite is already being used in Denmark to treat myopia in children, but there have not been any long-term studies done to see how effective it is. This condition will often start in children around the age of 6, and it can continue until they are 20 years old. It is linked to further eye problems later in life like cataracts and glaucoma, and that is why it is imperative that it is treated as soon as possible.
There are treatments in place now for children, including contact-lens-based treatment and medications, but they are not that effective at preventing the condition from getting worse. To complete this study, they are looking at the medical records of more than 700 children, and there is an even number of girls and boys.
They had 624 children take this new treatment, and the rest of the children did not take any medications. What they found was that taking the new treatment was associated with a slower rate of myopia progression, and it did not result in any side effects in children. It found that higher doses seemed to be even more effective. This is promising information for all parents out there who have children who are struggling with their eyesight.
Sources: UPI, BMJ Open

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