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A visiting art scholar known as “233” contributed an art installation to People’s Park estimated to be worth over $100,000 on September 3rd by gift-wrapping the large backhoe the University of California left in the park when it halted its construction and transforming it into a giant public swingset. The installation includes a plaque and is wrapped in UC school colors.

In the artist’s own words, “Saturday, September 3rd, 2022, exactly a month after the terrible events occured at People’s Park, the community of People’s Park is going to wrap up a special gift back to the UC Berkeley administration. We don’t want it! Spaniard artist 233 is leading an art project fruit of collective thought, sharing and work, promoted by People’s Park Council and supported by the whole community of People’s Park. The idea is to contribute through contemporary art with People’s Park’s struggle against the powerful unfair capitalist establishment in which every human being coexist.”

The public is welcome to attend the artist’s on-campus art opening, “Bulldozer Alarm”, will be this Thursday, September 8th, 2022, at 4:00 pm at Kroeber Hall. Professor Ramon Blanco-Becerra will be there to introduce the artist, the art, and take questions regarding 233’s large installations and vision. Community members expressed a hope that the giant transformation of the backhoe swingset will become a model of People’s Park’s nonviolent, creative response to UC’s destruction of a landmark which, on May 24, 2022, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Most mental illnesses are believed to be rooted in how the brain works or doesn’t work. For this reason, mental illness could correctly be classified as a medical problem, because the human brain is a bodily organ. Yet, because of our usage of English in the U.S., when most people communicate, mental illness is referred to as a mental problem and not a medical or physical one. It is imprecise but that’s how people communicate. And in the future, that may change. 
It seems harder for some people with mind and life changing psychiatric conditions to deal with “medical” problems, in comparison to non-afflicted mainstream people. Many people with mental illness who are faced with serious medical conditions don’t deal with them and just die, and often at far too young an age. This may be related to lack of addressing health concerns, and/or it may be related to the medications we have to take as well as the deprived and unhealthy lifestyle of many mentally ill people. For example, I’ve never met a mental health consumer who has gone in for coronary bypass. I’ve met family members who have. One of them was my father and the other was my uncle. Neither were mentally ill. Yet, I’ve met mentally ill people who did not take good care of themselves, and they died, sometimes without forewarning. 
Dealing with medical issues is a lot of work. You can’t let denial interfere with it, and you have to make an effort. Some of it can be scary. I, personally, have let medical issues go unaddressed for a long time. Meanwhile, more and more of them have come about, until now I’m facing maybe five medical issues that I haven’t addressed. I’m starting to take necessary actions about it, and I’m prioritizing the ones that are the most urgent. And I’m way behind on it. But if I want to live, that’s what I must do. 
There is never a convenient time to get surgery or to do other uncomfortable or difficult things that you have to do if you want to live. 
People who have a substantial psychiatric condition may have difficulties dealing with numerous areas of life. Socially, we may lack the proper guide as to how to interact. Many of us do not have lifelong friends. Many of us got sick with mental illness before we could have attended college. This, by itself, creates problems, because lack of college relegates a person to living in many respects at a lower level. 
But dealing with medical issues requires a lot of power. If you’re facing a necessary surgery, you have to do the things to prepare for it; you have to show up for it, and usually you have to be put to sleep under anesthesia. I had oral surgery at age 30 to remove all four wisdom teeth. I asked to be under strictly local anesthesia. The oral surgeons obliged me with this. They worked fast, maybe because they wanted to be headed home by five. I was given a break and was told in definite terms not so smoke. I went and smoked, and it caused the biggest nosebleed I’ve ever had. 
Medical problems don’t go away by wishing them away, and don’t go away by practicing mindfulness. There are specific things you have to do. Some of them can entail a lot of work and a lot of effort. And many of them are time consuming. If your living situation is restricted, you may not have sufficient liberty to properly address a medical concern. You must be able to get to and from appointments. You must be able to sometimes schedule a weekend appointment and go to it. You may need to have money in your pocket to pay related expenses. You can’t simply live in a supervised setting–in which you can’t do what you need to do. 
Denial doesn’t make a medical problem disappear. Going unacknowledged by those in charge of how you live, (if you aren’t fully independent) does not eliminate medical necessity. And dealing with a physical health issue requires full competence. 
Dealing with physical health issues (and again, mental illness is actually a physical/medical health problem) is often a part of aging. Modern medicine has devised a vast number of ways that people can survive problems that in the past just killed people. 
Those who disbelieve in science don’t seem to realize that there need not be a conflict between religion and science. Science describes how the physical universe works, but it doesn’t explain how we got here or how the physical universe came about. Science cannot explain consciousness. A psychiatrist, who I came to believe was a fool with an M.D., said “Consciousness could be an illusion.” This is as bogus as it gets. This takes atheism to a whole new level, where it becomes as bad as some cultlike churches. 
On the other hand, if your religion tells you to disregard science, you are depriving yourself of knowledge that people developed very methodically for thousands of years. Agnosticism, to me, is closer to the truth. This is because we don’t know what we don’t know. 
But we do know that we should get out of the way of a ten-thousand-pound speeding truck. And we do know that diseases, physical or psychiatric can kill, maim, or ruin. And this is to be avoided.  


Jack Bragen is a writer who lives in Martinez.
As September begins and the last days of summer slip away, I am wishing I had taken off to some place interesting in August. I took sort of a staycation with good intentions of continuing weekly Diaries, but good intentions slid into combining the last two weeks of August meetings into this one Diary for September 4. 
It is going to be a while longer before City Council goes back to hybrid meetings. City Council did meet August 23rd for 20 minutes and voted yes on the singular issue to renew continuing virtual meetings. There were 11 attendees with all, but one speaker requesting a return to hybrid council meetings. 
The Mental Health Commission met August 23rd in the evening and it felt more like watching a group therapy session with commissioners filling the role of de-escalation and therapists. Andrea Prichett and Edward Opton were on the agenda for reappointment and in the end the vote was to reappoint both commissioners without dissent, but the reappointment vote came after a rather ugly public grilling. It is unknown to those of us attending what set off the Chair Margaret Fine, but Ed Opton resonded this way, “ Ms Pritchett and I were not prepared for this kind of hostile grilling, nothing in the conversations until tonight [indicated] that Ms Pritchett or myself would be cross examined in this way” Opton went further to call the experience “unduly hostile.” Mary Lee Smith commented, “I feel like a lot of harm has been done, there needs to be repair…” 
At the Agenda Committee, Councilmember Taplin’s request for an information report on alternatives to chemical agents for response to violent large-scale crowd scenarios was referred to the Public Safety Committee and his item on an establishing an ordinance allowing efficiency units as small as 150 square feet instead of the current limit of 350 square feet was moved to action. Vision 2050 was removed from the proposed agenda by the City Manager. The final agenda for September 13th includes rezoning for R&D, safe streets, red curbing in fire zones, surveillance reports, homekey and much more. 
At the PG&E webinar to reduce wildfire risk, it was learned that PG&E cuts down over a million trees per year near or impinging on power lines. Trees are chipped and then “turned into electricity” which means they are burned. The greenwashing term is biofuel, but there is nothing green about chopping up and burning trees. Between wildfire, beef and toilet paper (Procter & Gamble, Kimberly-Clark and Georgia-Pacific are the worst), we are losing our forests worldwide. And, while thinking about forests being chopped down to flush down the toilet, don’t forget those convenient disposable diapers are made from trees too and take up to 500 years to decompose in landfill. Is it time for cloth again? 
The City and Visit Berkeley have plans to add 10 more IKE Kiosks to the Downtown. That is in addition to the five that are already installed. While Councilmember Harrison expressed her enthusiasm for the Ike Kiosks, she objected to adding ten more in the downtown. 
Helen Walsh had lots of comments and questions about IKE Kiosks. Walsh, who is a member of the Commission on Disability and low vision herself, commented that Berkeley has a large disabled population and asked, “How does it benefit me?” Walsh likened the IKE to a brick on a corner and asked, who is in charge of the content accessible to a screen reader, are there text changes for low vision, is the content following global accessibility standards, what are the accommodations for users of screen readers? When Jessica Brown representing IKE said they worked with the Federation for the Blind, Walsh responded that Federation for the Blind does not represent all disabilities. From the non-answers to Walsh’s questions by Jessica Brown – IKE, Jeffrey Church – Visit Berkeley and Kirin Slaughter – CoB Office of Economic Development it might be said IKE Kiosks are seriously deficient when it comes to doing the research and providing equity for persons with disabilities.  
Walsh also suggested since the IKEs have power, a possible benefit to the public would be an outlet for charging power wheelchairs and devices. Brown responded that had been considered by IKE and rejected, because they decided such charging services would bring loitering. Slaughter said charging stations were being considered for other locations. It seems pretty obvious it is the poor and homeless who could really benefit from access to charging and they are the same people who are not wanted around the electronic billboards except to find the screen on homeless services and shelter bed counts. 
The logical places for the Kiosks are at bus/transit stops, but that creates a problem with access for queuing and boarding. 
The next Ike Kiosk meeting is virtual on Wednesday, September 7 at 2pm to plan placement for IKE Kiosks in the Gillman District. 
Thursday afternoon, September 1, felt like the first honest conversation among WETA (Water Emergency Transportation Authority) board members and staff regarding ferry service and the challenges to attracting riders. People who can work remotely are not returning to the office more than a couple days a week if at all. Commuter riders are not returning. The first and last mile, getting to and from a ferry to the desired destination is a problem. Ferries are just not in convenient locations. To say ridership has returned to 75% of pre-pandemic as reported by staff was challenged by the chair pointing out it is just not supported by the rider charts. Why does this matter? Berkeley is still plowing ahead with plans for ferry service. Last heard the expectation is robust demand. And, WETA just completed a special session on an aggressive plan for expansion which was absent how it would be financed. Financing is supposed to be covered in a later session, but on September 1, they modified their advertising condition as was stated, “we need the money.” 
It looks like the involvement of the Housing Advisory Commission (HAC) is making the difference in resolving the complaints from tenants of Harriet Tubman Terrace. In July, tenants brought their complaints about construction work quality, debris, the manner in which tenants were relocated for construction and treatment while their apartments were being refurbished. Not every complaint is resolved yet, but Cassandra Palanza, Asset Manager, for Foundation Housing was able to report the actions taken and there appears to be good progress since July. 
The Wildfire Evacuation Workshop: Building Your Fire Weather Plan was rather poorly attended with little more than a handful of attendees, which was unfortunate. The workshop by Khin Chin was really very good. There will be a workshop on home hardening in the coming weeks, watch for it. https://berkeleyca.gov/safety-health/fire/fire-weather-evacuation 
Every eight years the State of California projects future population growth and estimates how much new housing is needed to accommodate all those new bodies. The process by which the housing is distributed around the state is called the Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA). The Housing Element is the plan each city (or county for rural areas) of where to put all those new housing units. 
The topic of speaker Michael Barnes for Community Catalysts for Local Control was “How California’s Sixth Cycle of the RHNA (Regional Housing Needs Assessment) was Rigged.“ Barnes’ message was that the proposed number of housing units cities are assigned to build are deliberately high and unachievable. This sets cities up for failure. When cities aren’t meeting the mandated targets by the fourth year of the RHNA cycle (the next cycle is 2023 – 2031), the review/approval process becomes “streamlined ministerial” AKA by-right. This means the project developer is no longer subject to the public review process. 
Some see ministerial / by-right approvals for large multi-unit, mixed-use (apartment buildings with commercial space at street level) as a big step in the right direction. Our state Senator, Nancy Skinner and Assemblywoman Buffy Wicks are on that train. As a regular attendee of the Zoning Adjustment Board and Design Review Committee meetings, there are most often significant positive changes in design from the review process and public input. Two of us Erin Diehm especially and myself have been successful in shifting landscape plans to native plants, increasing permeable paving and other measures that improve habitat and ecosystem survival. 
My personal view is this city is not doing enough right now in architectural design, land use and landscape planning requirements to prepare us for a hotter more unpredictable climate future. Those opportunities are missed now with every project and will be even worse with projects skipping over reviews and cutting corners to the extent possible to squeeze out the maximum profit while staying within building and zoning codes. 
Since I don’t attend statewide meetings, I can’t report whether or not the projected population growth and resulting allocation of new housing is based in a nefarious scheme. But, it should be asked how do the projections of population growth in California fit with the actual decrease as exemplified by the 2020 census and the loss of a congressional seat? 
Many cities have joined in legal action opposing the RHNA allocations. Berkeley did not join. After all, our mayor, Jesse Arreguin is President of the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) the organization tasked with distributing the RHNA allocations for the nine Bay area Counties and Arreguin headed the ABAG Housing Methodology Committee which determined the final housing allocation and the 8934 units assigned to Berkeley to construct in its 10.5 square miles. Our next door neighbor, Richmond with 52.5 square miles and many areas along transit corridors that would benefit from increased density is assigned 3614 units. https://abag.ca.gov/sites/default/files/documents/2022-04/Final_RHNA_Methodology_Report_2023-2031_March2022_Update.pdf 
The consequences of failing to meet the RHNA allocation is set in California Senate Bill 35 and what makes SB 35 worse is that the ministerial approval kicks in based on the number of units in the building permits that are pulled / exercised, not the number of units in the projects approved. Meaning that a city can approve stacks of new buildings, but if the owner of those projects decides to sit and not build the city falls into failing to meet the assigned RHNA allocation. Barnes hinted to expect a slowdown in building application permits until the halfway mark in the cycle so that the ministerial approval condition is triggered. 
Berkeley’s RHNA allocation for the next cycle years of 2023 – 2031 is 8,934 new housing units. Which includes 2446 very low-income units (120% AMI). According to these numbers, 43% of new housing is supposed to be for households earning less than 80% of AMI. 
Berkeley did not meet the mandated RHNA targets for new very low and low-income household units in the current RHNA cycle (2015 – 2023) and as a consequence is already on the list for ministerial approval of projects with 50% (or more) of the units allocated to household incomes with less than 80% AMI (Area Median Income). 
If all these numbers are meaningless check the charts on income by household size and matching “affordable” rents. 
Berkeley ran by the RHNA quota for building new market rate housing and escaped ministerial approval for building market rate projects, however, Berkeley is subject to SB 330 from our State Senator Nancy Skinner (signed into law 2019) which limits public review of projects meeting the criteria of SB 330 to 5 meetings. If you attend projects going through the city review process, you will hear staff keeping tabs on the number of meetings. Five meetings is a limiting factor in the review of the 8-story student housing project at 2065 Kittredge with a plan that the Landmarks Preservation Commission found disappointing 
WHAT YOU DO NOT SEE on the home page of the Berkeley City website is that the Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) for the RHNA cycle 2023 – 2031 Housing Element was just released Tuesday, August 30th for public comment/response. We have until October 17, 2022 at 5 pm to make our way through the 441 page report and the 108 pages of Appendices to submit comments. https://berkeleyca.gov/construction-development/land-use-development/general-plan-and-area-plans/housing-element-update 
The DEIR underlies the Housing Element, basically where are we going to put the 8934 new units. The DEIR is the singular action item at the Planning Commission on September 7. 
Fixing the broken access to city records with the new city website is expected to be on the September 20th City Council regular meeting agenda. 
Compiling the list of upcoming city meetings for the Activist’s Calendar means I am in the new city website a lot and that is giving way to emails asking for help in finding city documents. One request was for how to find older council video recordings. After taking a rather circuitous route I found the non-obvious answer, go to “your government” then to “city council” look to the list of choices on the right and go to “participating in City Council meetings” then look for “recorded videos” in the last paragraph under “make a plan to participate.” Click on “recorded videos” and you will have access to council videos for the last 10 years. 
Most people in Berkeley don’t care about these things, but for those of us who are monitoring city actions and looking up past history, the new website and “records online” can easily turn into hours lost in record searches and all too often a dead end. 
In closing my read of the week was An Immense World: How Animal senses Reveal Hidden Realms Around Us by Ed Yong. It is a dense read in print or ebook, but as an audiobook, I found it absolutely delightful filled with descriptions of how animals, creatures large and small perceive the world. It starts with dogs and how they explore the world through their nose, something any dog owner learns quickly in taking a dog for a walk. That is just the beginning. 
The chapters are organized by senses with marvelous stories of how creatures navigate their umwelt (environment) through their special highly developed senses and communication. The book is filled with constant surprises, like whales using echo/sonar low pitched sound that can travel up to 13,000 miles (if measured) to navigate the ocean, male moths with eyes around their penis for mating, the star-nosed mole that explores tunnels through touch with fingerlike extensions from its nose. There is so much to appreciate in the animal world around us. 
Edmund Soon-Weng Yong, the author, narrated the book. Yong is a Malaysian-born British Science journalist with, of course, a British accent.
Hellter Swelter

Our public servants in the state and media have been busy preparing the multitudes for a string of triple-digit temperatures but sometimes the advice falls short. A front-page Chronicle article advised: “People should protect themselves from the heat by keeping indoors as much as possible in the morning and afternoon.” (Apparently there’s no need to worry about dashing about in the mid-day sun.)

The Chron‘s climate experts also had a number of survival tips to keep cool. One was to visit shopping malls and other large spaces with air-conditioning. Another tip: drive around in a car with the air-conditioning turned on.

These survival tips amount to a stunning example of “causative blindness.”

Consider: Rising temperatures are the result of climate change, which is the result of carbon pollution, which is caused (in large measure) by driving around in gas-powered carbon polluters.

Is this how Earth’s last surviving humans will meet their end—huddled inside parked cars with the AC turned up high until their gas tanks run dry? 
Schooled in Violence 
In most countries, children understand that school is where you go to get an education. In the US, children are learning — through relentless repetition — that school is where you go to get shot. 
Last week, students at Madison Park Academy (an Oakland middle school), ran for the exits and hid under their desks when a 12-year-old student shot and seriously wounded a 13-year-old student. 
On September 2, the Chronicle updated the incident with an oddly reassuring headline. It read: “Oakland police says school shooting not ‘deliberate’.” 
So it was just an accident? Not quite. According to the Chron, OPD investigators determined the hospitalized victim “was not the intended target.” 
Move along. Nothing to see here. Counselors are standing by in the cafeteria. 
Related News: The Brady Campaign is predicting that “1,000 people will be shot” in the US in the course of the three-day Labor Day weekend. 
The Brady Bunch Puts the Bullet In Bulletin 
American rhetoric continues to go ballistic, and not just from the mil-speak word-bombers in the Military-Industrial-Media Complex. 
Apparently no one at the anti-gun Brady Campaign (named for Reagan-era press secretary and shooting victim James Brady) saw a problem with their email-blast about improving chances for Democrat Mandela Barnes to unseat GOPper Ron Johnson in Wisconsin’s November Senate race. The message’s subject line read: “One of our best shots at flipping a Senate seat.” 
Best Anti-nuclear War Protest Ever! 
The US Naval Base at Kitsap-Bangor in Washington State is the West Coast homeport for the Pentagon’s fleet of nuclear-armed Trident submarines. A single Trident sub carries the destructive force of over 1,200 Hiroshima bombs (the Hiroshima bomb was 15 kilotons). 
On August 8, a group of around 40 peace demonstrators converged on the road leading to the base’s Main Gate, blocking cars from entering or leaving the facility. Thirteen demonstrators were “detained and cited.” But thanks to a well-rehearsed No-Nukes Flash Mob, the soldiers and civilian employees stuck in traffic enjoyed one of the most entertaining peace protests ever staged. Check out the video
 
Diablo Blowback 
A local CODEPINK activist was alarmed by the news that Governor Gavin Newsom was planning to block the long-awaited shutdown and cleanup of the ancient Diablo Canyon nuclear complex. But when she contacted Senator Nancy Skinner to express her concern, the response left her livid. 
“I called and wrote to Skinner multiple times in the last week asking her to vote NO on SB 846, including filling out her message form where one indicates ‘support’ or ‘oppose’ on legislation coming up for a vote,” the CODEPINKer wrote. 
But Skinner’s emailed response triggered a constituent meltdown. It read: “Thank you for your recent correspondence regarding your support for Senate Bill 846: Diablo Canyon powerplant: extension of operations (Dodd).” [Emphasis added.] 
Papermaster was aghast that her opposition to the bill had been registered as support. “What if all of the people who sent their comments to her had their OPPOSITION to SB 846 changed to SUPPORT?!?!?!?” the actiist asked. 
The howls from anti-nuclear constituents apparently rattled some ears in Sacramento because, subsequently, Skinner’s office released a second re-written response that read: “Thank you for your recent correspondence regarding your opposition for Senate Bill 846: Diablo Canyon powerplant: extension of operations.” [Emphasis added once again.] 
Skinner’s revised reply included the note: “Though we disagree on the merits of this legislation, I value your opinion and appreciate you taking the time to write.” 
But was there ever a form letter addressed to reactor opponents in the first place? It appears that Skinner’s original note expressing “support for” the reactor had simply been changed to read: “opposition for.” But the phrasing is wrong: The letter should have read “opposition to” not “opposition for.” 
To keep up with Sen. Skinner’s other legislative work, click here. To read her official newsletter, click here
Gruesome Pro-Nuke Newsom Screws Some 
Anti-nuclear activist and prolific author Harvey Wasserman is outraged by Governor Gavin Newsom’s last-minute push to prolong the operating life of the crumbling Diablo Canyon reactor complex. In 2016, then-Lieutenant Governor Newsom endorsed Gov. Jerry Brown’s call to close the embattled and embrittled reactors. With the agreement of the NRC, PG&E, unions, and environmental groups, Diablo was slated for shutdown in 2024-5. 
In a recent op-ed, Wasserman opined that Newsom’s “shocking pro-nuke move comes parallel with the Governor’s attempt to tax rooftop solar out of existence.” In addition to a state-backed $1.4 billion “forgivable” loan to PG&E to operate Diablo past its retirement date, Wasserman notes that the governor “is now assaulting home-owned solar with deadly taxes and gutted buy-backs.” Wasserman suggests a motive for Newsom’s about-face: “Senate Bill 846 begs the nuclear/utility industry to fund his presidential campaign.” 
Perhaps it’s time to give the Gov a new nickname. Instead of Governor Gavin, he deserves to be called Governor Give-in. 
Renewal Creep 
Renewal Creep used to be an oddity. Now it’s become a thing. Renewal Creep is what happens when you subscribe to a magazine and receive a renewal envelope (two, three, four, five, six) months before the original subscription runs out. 
Example: In mid-April, I sent off a check for a subscription to the Smithsonian magazine. A renewal notice arrived in early August, informing me that a payment was “due by 9/10/2022”. A small disclaimer at the bottom of the Renewal Statement read: “Smithsonian publishes monthly except January/February and July/August and when future combined issues are published that count as two as indicated on the issue’s cover.” 
I think that’s another way of saying “You may only get six issues per year. 
Example: Even the highly respected publication, Consumer Reports, has been found using “renewal creep” on its subscribers. A renewal notice arrived in early August with a bold-faced demand: “Please reply by 08/25/22.” Elsewhere on the same billing statement was a note (in smaller, non-bold type) that read: “EXPIRES JAN/2024.” 
In addition to being pre-subscribed for more than 16 months, the renewal notice also suggested extending a “free gift subscription” I previously shared with a family member. This time, however, the “gift” subscription was no longer free. The invoice added another $15 to the standard $30 subscription rate for a total of $45.75. And what was the extra 75 cents for? Dunno. Consumer Reports didn’t report. 
The Singing Revolution  
Most folk wouldn’t consider singing to be a tool of revolution. But raising voices along with clenched fists is exactly how the citizens of Estonia freed themselves from Soviet occupation. Don’t believe it? Then check out The Singing Revolution, a film that documents how “between 1987 and 1991, hundreds of thousands of Estonians gathered publicly to sing forbidden patriotic songs and share protest speeches, risking their lives to proclaim their desire for independence.” 
While violence and bloodshed was the unfortunate end result in other occupied nations of the USSR, the revolutionary songs of the Estonians anchored their struggle for freedom, which was ultimately accomplished without the loss of a single life. 
In this stunning film, Mart Laar, Estonia’s first post-Soviet Prime Minister and a Singing Revolution leader, recounts how Estonia’s nonviolent uprising succeeded:
“The young people, without any political party, and without any politicians, just came together … not only tens of thousands but hundreds of thousands … to gather and to sing and to give this nation a new spirit.” 
Filmmakers James Tusty and Maureen Castle Tusty have joined up with World BEYOND War to offer online screenings of The Singing Revolution between September 4-10. When you sign up to view the film, you’ll also receive an invitation to participate with a live Q&A with the filmmakers at 11AM on Saturday, September 10. Warning: The following trailer contains images of war crimes. 
 
Letters Not Printed by the Chronicle 
On August 28, the Chronicle ran a story with the headline: “Pentagon orders overhaul to avoid civilian casualties” that praised the military for responding to Warmerica’s habit of wantonly slaughtering civilians around the world. The following letter was shared with the Chronicle but was not selected for publication: 
“On August 29, 2021, a US Hellfire missile fired at a car in a courtyard in Kabul, Afghanistan, killed Zemani Ahmadi and 9 family members — including seven children. General Mark Milley claimed the bombing killed an ISIS terrorist and praised the attack as ‘a righteous strike.’ 
“That was not true. Ahmadi was an employee of Nutrition and Education International, a US-based humanitarian organization. 
“After the New York Times released videos that contradicted the Pentagon’s lie, Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin vowed to create new guidelines ‘to prevent, mitigate and respond to civilian harm.’ One year later, Austin’s 36-page ‘action plan’ has been released. 
“Unfortunately the memo fails to hold military officials responsible for such deadly mistakes in the future nor does it call for disciplinary action. Defense Department official John Kirby admitted the Pentagon was ‘not approving or calling for additional accountability.’ 
“No apology was forthcoming from Gen. Milley. No official responsible for the fatal Kabul attack was fired, demoted, or asked to resign. 
“If the Pentagon is serious about halting its mounting toll of civilian deaths, there’s a simple solution: Stop firing missiles and start firing generals.” 
A New Message Looking for T-shirt 
The War Machine Will Never Work
Because It’s Missing a Peace 
I Fought the Law and the Law Won 
 

Dear Governor Newsom, Financing your political ambitions by favors to the oil, nuclear, and agribusiness industries is undermining your support among California voters. 
Your intense push to break the agreement to close the Diablo Canyon nuclear reactor in 2025, instead of full support for clean, safe, just, affordable energy sources, will cause a tragic delay in California’s transition to clean energy (it is outrageous that the toxicity of radioactive nuclear waste was ignored). It will harm Californians for generations to come. 
Your refusal to ban fracking ignores the huge damage to human health caused by methane. And your support for Stuart Resnick and the other agribusiness billionaires in their efforts to grab ever more of California’s limited water supplies demonstrates where your interests lie. If you also reject the need for essential farm labor to organize, given their vulnerability to extreme weather, the new normal of the climate crisis, you will lose any remnants of credibility with California voters.
Why do we need unions anyway? Because they are essential for America. Unions are the only large-scale movement left in America that serve as a countervailing balance against corporate power, acting in the economic interest of the middle class. Remember corporations did not all of a sudden give workers two days off each week, which we now call weekends, or paid vacations and sick leave, or rights at the workplace, or pensions, or overtime pay. Virtually all the benefits we have at work, whether in the public or private sector, are because unions fought hard and long against big business who did everything they could to prevent giving us these rights. 
But the decline of unions over the past few decades has left corporations and the rich with essentially no powerful opposition. You may take issue with a particular unions position on an issue, but remember they are the only real organized check on the power of the business community in this country. Consider that during the COVID-19 pandemic, billionaires in the United States have become unfathomably richer to the tune of $637 billion total. while millions of Americans lost their jobs.  
Now that the pandemic is largely under control, unionization is making a resurgence. During the first six months of Fiscal Year 2022 (October 1–March 31), union representation petitions filed at the NLRB ave increased 57%—up to 1,174 from 748 during the first half of FY2021. At the same time, unfair labor practice charges have increased 14%—from 7,255 to 8,254. A representation petition is filed by employees, unions, or employers with an NLRB Field Office to have the NLRB conduct an election to determine if employees wish to be represented by a union 
According to a recent Gallup poll 74% of Americans now approve of labor unions. up from 64% before the pandemic. And about 1 in 10 nonunion members said they are extremely interested” in joining a union. After years of declining influence, workers are using their leverage to unionize companies large and small to improve wages, benefits, and working conditions. 
You may take issue with a particular unions position on an issue, but remember they are the only real organized check on the power of the business community in this country.  
Enjoy the three-day Labor Day weekend. 
 
 

In Kabul, Afghanistan, young girls are under severe restrictions denied a secondary education and are constantly monitored by heavily armed, ruthless religious police and are harshly punished for the slightest infractions. 
The Taliban provide few explanations for their ruthless treatment of women and for their blatant partiality to boys. They justify their actions claiming they are merely following Sharia Law which initially obtained passages for the express purpose of protecting women as they made long journeys in the desert, – hence the edicts of wearing burkas and insisting on male guardianships. Sadly, the Taliban and other leaders in the Islamic world are trapped in a time warp and insist on adhering to these ancient customs which are severely oppressing women.  
Islam is full of contradictions and, like many other religions, needs to be updated with a uniform set of rules to ensure complete gender equality and not relegate women to become baby bearing machines. Harsh admonitions should be purged. For example, stoning of women for adultery, and polygamy should be banished. Although a recent fatwa, denies adultery is appropriate grounds for stoning adulterers is an apostasy. 
Women must be accorded complete equality in inheritance rights and divorce property settlements. Body coverings should be banished as this acts as a serious impediment to smooth integration into western countries and is an archaic law dating back to desert travel. The current law demanding girls be accompanied by a male guardian is another archaic law dating back to the early days of Islam, to protect the molestation of women. 
Few of the world religions, including Islam, can lay claim to fostering peace, justice and harmony. Finally, it is time radical Islam put down their guns and liberate their most cherished asset, their girls and women. This simple but transformative action would ignite the whole of the Islamic world for the good. No longer would Islam be feared but admired and emulated.
Editor’s Note: The latest issue of the Pepper Spray Times is now available.

You can view it absolutely free of charge by clicking here . You can print it out to give to your friends.

Grace Underpressure has been producing it for many years now, even before the Berkeley Daily Planet started distributing it, most of the time without being paid, and now we’d like you to show your appreciation by using the button below to send her money.

This is a Very Good Deal. Go for it! 

Worth Noting:

Tuesday City Council is officially on recess, but the Agenda Committee meets at 2:30 pm to plan the September 20th Council meeting (the draft agenda follows posts by day of the week). The full council meets at 4:30 pm in closed session. The PAB Director is on the agenda. The Personnel Board meets at 7 pm to consider new classifications and salaries. For ease of review the annual salaries are included in this summary.

Wednesday afternoon the IKE Kiosk location meeting for the Gillman District is at 2 pm. The evening is packed with the Commission on Disability at 6 pm, the Library Trustees at 6:30 pm will consider modifications of policies for the tool lending library, the Homeless Panel of Experts at 7 pm will consider allocation of Measure P monies and the Planning Commission at 7 pm has one agenda item the DEIR for the Housing Element. Catalyst Town Hall session 3 on housing starts at 5 pm.

Thursday morning is a free webinar on Toxics and Reproductive Health at 10 am, the Loan Administration meets at 12 noon, the Fair Campaign Practices and Open Government Commission meets at 6 pm and ZAB meets at 7 pm. The ZAB posting is not “live” which means there are no working links to the projects being reviewed and no zoom link. Check the ZAB website later for updates. The League of women Voters candidate forums begin on Thursday with District 8 at 5 pm and District 1 at 7:30 pm.

Saturday BNC holds the BUSD School Board forum at 10 am.

Sunday, September 11th is the Solano Stroll.

The September 13th regular Council meeting agenda is available for comment with the full list of agenda items and links at the end of this email.

Don’t forget to check for meetings posted on short notice https://berkeleyca.gov/

Tuesday, September 6, 2022 
 
AGENDA AND RULES COMMITTEE Special Meeting at 2:30 pm 
Videoconference: https://cityofberkeley-info.zoomgov.com/j/1601730715 
Teleconference: 1-669-254-5252 or 1-833-568-8864 (toll free) Meeting ID: 160 173 0715 
AGENDA: Public Comment on non-agenda and items 1 – 7. 1. Minutes, 2. Review and Approve 9/20/2022 draft agenda – use link or read full draft agenda after list of city meetings, 3. Berkeley Considers, 4. Adjournment in Memory, 5. Council workssessions, 6. Referrals for scheduling, 7. Land Use Calendar, Referred Items for Review: 8. COVID, 9. Return to In-person meetings for legislative bodies, Unscheduled Items: 10. Discussion Regarding Design and Strengthening of Policy Committees, 11. Supporting Commissions, Guidance on Legislative Proposals. 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/city-council/council-committees/policy-committee-agenda-rules 
 
CITY COUNIL CLOSED Session at 4:30 pm 
Videoconference: https://cityofberkeley-info.zoomgov.com/j/1619251833 
Teleconference: 1-669-254-5252 or 1-833-568-8864 (toll free) Meeting ID: 161 925 1833 
AGENDA: 1. Conference with Legal Councel – existing litigation a. Deal v. CoB Alameda Cpunty Superior Court Case No. RG21110607, b. Secure Justice v. CoB alameda County Superior Court Case No. 21CV003630, c. Timothy Gardner v. CoB, U.S. District Court Northern District Case No. 3:18-cv-7784, 2. Public Employee Appointments a. Director of Police Accountability, b. Director of Information Technology. 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/city-council/city-council-agendas 
 
PERSONNEL BOARD at 7 pm 
Videoconference: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87659944705?pwd=ck5ZRkZYRXlwdDdwOStwSGlFelc3Zz09 
Teleconference: 1-669-900-9128 Meeting ID: 576 5994 4705 Passcode: 87625 
AGENDA: All salary ranges are annual – VI. Recommendation to revise the classification and salary range ($110,780.76 to $133,952.04) of Disability Services Specialist to ADA Program Coordinator, VII. Recommendation to revise the classification and salary range ($166,896 to $204,912) of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer, VIII. Recommendation to establish the classification and salary range ($137,966.40 to $181,292.76) of Assistant to the City Attorney, IX. Recommendation to revise the Deputy City Attorney I-III Classification and establish Deputy City Attorney IV Classification and Salary Range, ($191,236.44 to $235,123.20), X. Recommendation to expand the Program Manager Series base range ($94,657.32 to $112,367.88) by establishing the Principal Program Manager classification and salary range ($151,819.20 to $183,718.85). 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/boards-commissions/personnel-board 
 
Wednesday, September 7, 2022 
 
 
IKE Smart City Kiosk Phase II at 2 pm 
Videoconference: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89186865266?pwd=R2VxSlZzL2FNRDNSd0dXNlEwMkdkdz09 
AGENDA: Round 2 Location Community meeting Gilman District 
https://www.visitberkeley.com/plan-your-trip/ike-kiosks/ 
 
BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES at 6:30 pm 
Videoconference: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_3yJHTmTMSUmywstW8mYuKg?_x_zm_rtaid=WYCllGN5QVaPE_l85pMVSg 
Teleconference: 1-669-900-9128 Meeting ID: 860 4230 6505 
AGENDA: Consent item C. approve preparing for 20th Annual Authors Dinner Event on March 4, 2023, D. Purchase Order for $75,000 for vehicle, Action: A. Circulation Policy Update on reducing limitations on tool lending library, eliminating fines, simplifying tool lending periods, B. Bylaws update. 
https://www.berkeleypubliclibrary.org/about/board-library-trustees 
 
COMMISSION ON DISABILITY at 6 pm 
Videoconference: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85490170295?pwd=RDhBWDdVSUY5RzZQYXhkUTkyUk90Zz09 
Teleconference: 1-699-900-9128 Meeting ID: 854 9017 0295 
AGENDA: No action items, items for discussion 1. Inclusive Disaster Registry, 2. Accessibility of Voicemail system, 3. Public participation, 4. Berkeley Bike Plan, 5. Data, Outreach & Access to City of Berkeley Programs and Services. 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/boards-commissions/commission-disability 
 
HOMELESS SERVICES PANEL OF EXPERTS at 7 pm 
Videoconference: https://zoom.us/j/92491365323 
Teleconference: 1-669-900-6833 Meeting ID: 924 9136 5323 
AGENDA: 7. Progressive real estate transfer tax reform proposal to amend Measure P, 8.9. Letter of support for allocation of Measure P monies towards development of supportive housing at 1367 University, 10. Discussion and possible action of site visit to STAIR/Pathways. 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/boards-commissions/homeless-services-panel-experts 
 
PLANNING COMMISSION at 7 pm 
Videoconference: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/83514287347 
Teleconference: 1-669-900-6833 Meeting ID: 835 1428 7347 
AGENDA: one action item 9. Public Hearing: Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) Housing element Update Project (packet 589 pages includes the DEIR) 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/boards-commissions/planning-commission 
 
Community Catalysts for Local Control at 5 pm 
Go to website to register: https://catalystsca.org/activities/townhall-2022/ 
AGENDA: Housing Solutions and California’s Failed Policies with Bob Silvestri 
The Town Hall series is recorded and available at https://catalystsca.org/activities/townhall-2022/ 
 
Thursday, September 8, 2022 
 
LEAGUE of WOMEN VOTERS CANDIDATE FORUMS 
Berkeley City Council District 8 at 5 pm 
Berkeley City Council District 1 at 6:30 pm 
Use website to register for videoconference and submit questions 
https://www.lwvbae.org/league-news/all-candidate-forums/ 
 
LOAN ADMINISTRATION BOARD at 12 pm 
Videoconference: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83730465774?pwd=TEpQT1NjalZJME5RZDA5YjdGWjFGdz09 
Teleconference: 1-669-900-9128 Meeting ID: 837 3046 5774 
AGENDA: B) Program Review a. 11 active loans for $520,000, b. $294,000 in funding available for lending and admin costs, c. Working Solutions CDFI under contract for loan servicing and technical assistance, C) Action Items i) Receive a request from the California Jazz Conservancy to modify guarantors of loan #0477 ii) Declare loan #480 to Kidventurez as Default an authorize recovery against collateral, iii) Consider resuming loan repayment requirements for RLF loan recipients. 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/boards-commissions/loan-administration-board 
 
FAIR CAMPAIGN PRACTICES (FCPC) and OPEN GOVERNMENT COMMISSION (OGC) at 6 pm 
Videoconference: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82004135411 
Teleconference: 1-669-900-6833 Meeting ID: 820 0413 5411 
AGENDA: packet is 233 pages 6. FCPC report from office holder accounts (pages 8 – 82), 7. Review of contribution limits (pages 83 – 104), 9. Presentation: Due Process in FCPC and OGC Quasi-Judicial Proceedings, 10. Informational items Berkeley Election Reform Act – A Guide to Navigating Local Election Rules (pages 104 – 135), 11. Matching funds disbursed (page 136), 12. Certification of Public Financing Program Participants (pages 137 – 233) 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/boards-commissions/fair-campaign-practices-commission 
 
ZONING ADJUSTMENTS BOARD 
Videoconference: not provided CHECK for ZOOM LATER use website link 
Teleconference: Meeting ID:  
AGENDA: on consent 
2377 Oregon – on consent – demolish single family dwelling and construct new 2614 sq ft 2-story single family dwelling with one off-street parking space on non-conforming lot 
2390 Fourth Street – on consent – all existing full-service restaurant to serve beer and wine 
742 Graysonon consentdemolish two non-residential buildings on 2.5 acre industrial site and construct a research and development (R&D) and manufacturing building consisting of approx. 213,000 sq ft of gross floor area and a parking garage with 325 spaces 
1151 Grizzly Peak – staff recommend approve – legalize one accessory building in the rear setback on single-family lot 
2136 San Pablo – new public hearing – DEIR scoping session (comments dues 9/16/2022 by 5 pm) and project preview – demolish existing 9281 sq ft 1-story non-residential building and construct new 123 unit 6-story mixed-use with 3-live/work and parking garage with 50 off-street auto parking spaces on ground floor, density bonus project with 10 units to very low income households. 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/boards-commissions/zoning-adjustments-board 
 
Webinar: How Environmental Toxicity, Inequity and Capitalism Affect Reproductive Health at 10 am (webinar is free)  
Register: https://bit.ly/3A3Ev8o 
AGENDA: will unveil a new report written by the Center called “The Influence of Environmental Toxicity, Inequity and Capitalism on Reproductive Health”. The report describes the reproductive harm caused by fossil fuel extraction, plastic products, industrial agriculture, and climate change. The webinar will discuss these topics along with case studies and solutions.  
Sponsored by Center for Biological Diversity https://www.biologicaldiversity.org/ 
 
Friday, September 9, 2022 – no meetings found 
 
Saturday, September 10, 2022 
BERKELEY NEIGHBORHOODS COUNCIL at 10 am 
Videoconference: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/85935407339?pwd=S1VmYkhzOTkxVkJNaXNlOXpVK3dLQT09 
Teleconference: 1-669-444-9171 Meeting ID: 859 3540 7339 Passcode: 349962 
AGENDA: Election Forum – BUSD School Board, 10 am introductions, 10:10 – 10:30 Candidate statements (Ka’Dojah Brown, Mike Chang, Norma J F Harrison, Reichi Lee, Tatiana Guerreiro Ramos, Jennifer Shanoski), 10:30 – 12 noon Questions for the Candidates. 
Co-sponsored with BCA 
https://berkeleyneighborhoodscouncil.com/ 
 
SOLANO STROLL-ISH 10 am – 5 pm 
A sidewalk event with activities, entertainment – (the mini stroll – no booths) 
https://www.solanoavenueassn.org/events/solano-avenue-stroll/ 
 
Sunday, September 11, 2022  
SOLANO STROLL 10 am – 5 pm,  
A closed street event with booths, food, entertainment, crafters (the big event) 
https://www.solanoavenueassn.org/events/solano-avenue-stroll/ 
 
++++++++++++++++++++ 
Tuesday, September 6, 2022 
AGENDA and RULES COMMITTEE at 2:30 pm 
CITY COUNCIL DRAFT AGENDA for SEPTEMBER 20, 2022 
Videoconference: https://cityofberkeley-info.zoomgov.com/j/1601730715 
Teleconference: 1-669-254-5252 or 1-833-568-8864 (toll free) Meeting ID: 160 173 0715 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/city-council/council-committees/policy-committee-agenda-rules 
AGENDA CONSENT: 

  1. Resolution Local Emergency Due to COVID-19
  2. City Legislative Bodies to continue to meet via videoconference
  3. Establish the 2023 Council meeting schedule with starting time 6 pm
  4. 2023 Tax Rate: Transportation Network Company User Tax (lyft, Uber, etc.) for trips originating in CoB $0.53885 single rider, $0.26249 per person pooled trip
  5. Amend Contract No. 084349-1 add $45,000 total $261,282 with AMCS Inc for Zero Wste PC Software Maintenance and Professional Services and extend from 7/1/2022 thru 6/31/2025 (June has only 30 days),
  6. Purchase Order using General Services Administration for $250,000 for vehicles – the type of vehicles or whether combustion engine or EV to be purchased is not specified
  7. Amend Contract No. 105921-1 add $195,000 total $1,047,200 with TruPoint Solutions LLC for Accela professional services and extend 2 years 6/1/2015 to 6/30/2024,
  8. Contract $714,022 with SCS Engineers to provide engineering, maintenance, and monitoring services for the landfill to meet mandatory compliance requirements at Cesar Chavez Park from 1/1/2023 – 6/30/2026
  9. Contracts on-call arborist services $125,000 Davey Resource Group, Inc, HortScience Bartlett Consulting $125,000 11/1/2022 – 12/31/2025
  10. Contracts on-call engineering services total $6,900,000, 1. CSW Stuber-Stroeh Engineering Group, Inc $750,000, 2. HDR Engineering, Inc. $750,000, 3. LCC Engineering & Surveying, Inc $1,500,000, 4. Mark Thomas & Company, Inc $750,000, 5. Park Engineering, Inc $1,500,000, 6. Pavement Engineering Inc $1,500,000, 7. SCI Consulting Group $150,000
  11. Amend Contract No. 10350 (112199-1) add $100,000 total $250,000 with Technology, Engineering, and Construction, Inc for tank maintenance and certification services and extend to 6/30/2024,
  12. Amend Contract No. 31900085 add $45,000 total $231,472 with Syntech Systems, Inc for service and support of infrastructure and software for City’s Fleet Fueling Program,
  13. Contract $177,218.68 includes contingency $23,115 with Shaw Industries for Civic Center Building Replacement Project,

ACTION: 

  1. CM & Jordan Klein – Zoning Ordinance Amendments Making Technical Edits and Corrections includes, zoning districts, C-C, C-e, C-NS, C-DMU, Protected Uses, Setbacks, Usable Open Space, Required Parking Spaces, Design Review,
  2. Hahn co-sponsors Taplin, Bartlett – Restoring and Improving Access to City of Berkeley Website and Archival Materials,
  3. CM & Lisa Warhuus – Extending Community Agency for 1 year at existing levels and postponing RFP process until FY 2024,
  4. Arreguin co-sponsors Bartlett, Hahn, Taplin – refer to city attorney and CM to draft ordinance on apprenticeship training standards (HARD HAT ORDINANCE)

Information Reports: 

  1. Audit status Report Response: Code Enforcement Resources Significantly Constrained and Improvements Needed in Case Management and Oversight
  2. Update on the Implementation of Fair and Impartial Policing Task Force Recommendations.

 
++++++++++++++++ 
 
SEPTEMBER 13, 2022 CITY COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING at 6 pm 
Videoconference: https://cityofberkeley-info.zoomgov.com/j/1611765730 
Teleconference: 1-669-254-5252 or 1-833-568-8864 (toll free) Meeting ID: 161 176 5730 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/city-council/city-council-agendas 
AGENDA CONSENT:  

  1. Amend Contract 084534-1 add $188,955 total $1,008,291.20 and extend from 9/30/2010 to 6/30/2024 with NextGen Helathcare Information Systems, Inc
  2. Amend Contract 31900288 add $122,000 total $606,800 and extend to 6/30/2023 with Disability Access Consultants for ADA Transition Plan
  3. Contract 32100194 add $260,000 total $4,556,733 with Bay Cities Paving & Grading, Inc for Street Rehabilitation FY 2021 Project
  4. Minutes
  5. Contract $87,675 with Municipal Resource Group for addressing impacts resulting from the Great Resignation
  6. Amend Contract add $8000 total $228,000 and extend to 9/14/2023 with Orsolya Kuti, DVM for on-site veterinary services for Berkeley Animal Care Services,
  7. Formal Bid Solicitation and RFP $440,000,
  8. Request for Proposal for Project Homekey consider a reservation of up to $8.5 million in general funds collected pursuant to Measure P and/or other funding
  9. Contract $120,000 for 10/1/2023 to 5/30/2023 with Tiana Sanchez International LLC for HHCS Equity Consulting services,
  10. Amend Contract add $57,100 total $220,628 with Kings View Professional Services to provide mental health Financial reporting services thru 6/30/2024,
  11. Submit grant agreements for $912,213 for Future of Public Health program for FY 2023,
  12. Donation of Painting Services from MB Jessee Painting, Inc for interior areas of 1900 6th Street estimated value $8,994,
  13. Amend Contract add 3 years 6/1/2022-6/30/2025 at decreased annual rate of $570,000 total $7,393,611 with Innovative Claim Solutions (ICS) for claims administration of the City’s Workers’ Compensation Program,
  14. Contract $71,481 total $236,305 9/29/2022 – 9/28/2023 with AHEAD, Onc using California Department of General Services (CGS) for Varonis software licenses and professional services,
  15. Lease Agreement 80 (North Building) 82/84 & 90 Bolivar Drive in Aquatic Park with Waterside Workshops for 11/1/2022 – 11/1/2031
  16. Donation $3400 for Memorial Bench at Cesar Chavez Park in memory of Walt and Trudee Rowson,
  17. Donation $3400 for Memorial Bench at Cesar Chavez Park in memory of Don Rothenberg,
  18. Donation $3400 for Memorial Bench at Indian Rock Park in memory of Dave Altman,
  19. Contract $480,000 with 14.58% contingency of $70,000 total $550,000 with Bellingham, Inc to replace and repair docks at the Berkeley Marina,
  20. Revenue Grant $180,000 from California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) for 2023 Selective Enforcement Program (STEP) for 10/1/2022 – 9/30/2023
  21. 2022 Vision Zero Program (Berkeley Bicycle and Pedestrian Plans) Grant Applications authorizes CM to submit grant application to federal Safe Streets and Roads for All (SS4A),
  22. Disaster and Fire Safety Commission –Red Curbs and Visible Signage, request for immediate remedial action to improve evacuation, replace signage as necessary and red curb fire hydrant areas and pinch points
  23. Mental Health Commission – Appoint Judy Appel to Mental Health Commission,
  24. Peace and Justice Commission – Adopt Resolution on Berkeley’s Commitment to Abortion Access
  25. Arreguin, co-sponsors Robinson, Hahn – $1000 Expenditure Amount for Pacific Center for Human Growth,
  26. Arreguin, co-sponsor Hahn – Correction to COVID-19 Emergency Response Ordinance BMC 13.110 Ordinance 7,762-N.S. relates to tenant protections
  27. Taplin – Resolution in Support of High-Quality, Equitable Healthcare Services at UCSF,
  28. Taplin – Berkeley Youth Alternative (BYA) Charity Golf Classic,
  29. Taplin, co-sponsors Droste, Wengraf, Kesarwani – California Marriage Equality Resolution (repeal Prop 8)
  30. Robinson, co-sponsors Taplin, Arreguin, Harrison – Keep Innovation in Berkeley refer to CM and Planning Commission to return to council Zoning Ordinance amendments, codified performance standards and other actions to encourage growth and retention of R & D,
  31. Robinson & Bartlett – Relinquishment of up to $500 for Center for Independent Living’s 50th Anniversary,

ACTION: 

  1. Surveillance Technology Report, Surveillance Acquisition Report and Automatic License Plate Readers,
  2. An Ordinance Repealing chapter BMC 12.76 and repealing ordinance 7643-N.S.– relates to campers, house cars, parking,
  3. Taplin – Equitable Safe Streets and Climate Justice Resolution – Resolution committing to expenditure of City and state/federal matching/recurring funds on city-maintained roads, sidewalks and bike lanes to accelerate safety improvements,
  4. Taplin, co-sponsor Robinson – Efficiency Unit Ordinance Reviewed by Land Use – Refer to City Manager and Planning Commission to adopt objective standards for Efficiency Unit Ordinance,

INFORMATION REPORTS 

  1. Council Shot Term Referral Process – Quarterly Update,
  2. Federal Economic Relief Spending
  3. Sanctuary City Contracting Compliance Report FY 2022
  4. Environment and Climate Commission 2022 Work Plan
  5. Planning Commission FY 2022-23 Work Plan

 
+++++++++++++++++++ 
 
LAND USE CALENDAR: 
Public Hearing to be scheduled 
1201 – 1205 San Pablo (construct mixed-use building) 9/29/2022 
2018 Blake (construct multi-family residential building) 10/6/2022 
1643-47 California (new basement and 2nd story) 11/3/2022 
Remanded to ZAB or LPC 
1205 Peralta – Conversion of an existing garage 
Notice of Decision (NOD) and Use Permits with the End of the Appeal Period 
Bad news on tracking approved projects in the appeal period. Samantha Updegrave, Zoning Officer, Principal Planner wrote the listing of projects in the appeal period can only be found by looking up each project individually through permits online by address or permit number https://berkeleyca.gov/sites/default/files/2022-03/Online-Building-Permits-Guide.pdf 
 
The website with easy to find listing of projects in the appeal period was left on the “cutting room floor” another casualty of the conversion to the new City of Berkeley website.  
Please ask for it to be restored. 
 
WORKSESSIONS: 
September 20 Residential Objective Standards for Middle Housing at 4 pm 
October 6 Measure O Report and Update at 4 pm (If approved this meeting will be moved to October 11, 2022) 
Unscheduled Presentations 
Civic Arts Grantmaking Process & Capital Grant Program 
Fire Facilities Study Report 
African American Holistic Resource Center (November 15) 
(removed – Cannabis Health Considerations) 
 
Kelly Hammargren’s on what happened the preceding week can be found in the Berkeley Daily Planet www.berkeleydailyplanet.com under Activist’s Diary. This meeting list is also posted at https://www.sustainableberkeleycoalition.com/whats-ahead.html on the Sustainable Berkeley Coalition website. 
If you would like to receive the Activist’s Calendar as soon as it is completed send an email to [email protected]. If you wish to stop receiving the weekly summary of city meetings please forward the weekly summary you received to [email protected] 
 
Worth Noting:  
Tuesday City Council is officially on recess, but the Agenda Committee meets at 2:30 pm to plan the September 20th Council meeting (the draft agenda follows posts by day of the week). The full council meets at 4:30 pm in closed session. The PAB Director is on the agenda. The Personnel Board meets at 7 pm to consider new classifications and salaries. For ease of review the annual salaries are included in this summary. 
Wednesday afternoon the IKE Kiosk location meeting for the Gillman District is at 2 pm. The evening is packed with the Commission on Disability at 6 pm, the Library Trustees at 6:30 pm will consider modifications of policies for the tool lending library, the Homeless Panel of Experts at 7 pm will consider allocation of Measure P monies and the Planning Commission at 7 pm has one agenda item the DEIR for the Housing Element. Catalyst Town Hall session 3 on housing starts at 5 pm. 
Thursday morning is a free webinar on Toxics and Reproductive Health at 10 am, the Loan Administration meets at 12 noon, the Fair Campaign Practices and Open Government Commission meets at 6 pm and ZAB meets at 7 pm. The ZAB posting is not “live” which means there are no working links to the projects being reviewed and no zoom link. Check the ZAB website later for updates. The League of women Voters candidate forums begin on Thursday with District 8 at 5 pm and District 1 at 7:30 pm. 
Saturday BNC holds the BUSD School Board forum at 10 am. 
Sunday, September 11th is the Solano Stroll. 
 
The September 13th regular Council meeting agenda is available for comment with the full list of agenda items and links at the end of this email. 
 
Don’t forget to check for meetings posted on short notice https://berkeleyca.gov/ 
 
Tuesday, September 6, 2022 
 
AGENDA AND RULES COMMITTEE Special Meeting at 2:30 pm 
Videoconference: https://cityofberkeley-info.zoomgov.com/j/1601730715 
Teleconference: 1-669-254-5252 or 1-833-568-8864 (toll free) Meeting ID: 160 173 0715 
AGENDA: Public Comment on non-agenda and items 1 – 7. 1. Minutes, 2. Review and Approve 9/20/2022 draft agenda – use link or read full draft agenda after list of city meetings, 3. Berkeley Considers, 4. Adjournment in Memory, 5. Council workssessions, 6. Referrals for scheduling, 7. Land Use Calendar, Referred Items for Review: 8. COVID, 9. Return to In-person meetings for legislative bodies, Unscheduled Items: 10. Discussion Regarding Design and Strengthening of Policy Committees, 11. Supporting Commissions, Guidance on Legislative Proposals. 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/city-council/council-committees/policy-committee-agenda-rules 
 
CITY COUNIL CLOSED Session at 4:30 pm 
Videoconference: https://cityofberkeley-info.zoomgov.com/j/1619251833 
Teleconference: 1-669-254-5252 or 1-833-568-8864 (toll free) Meeting ID: 161 925 1833 
AGENDA: 1. Conference with Legal Councel – existing litigation a. Deal v. CoB Alameda Cpunty Superior Court Case No. RG21110607, b. Secure Justice v. CoB alameda County Superior Court Case No. 21CV003630, c. Timothy Gardner v. CoB, U.S. District Court Northern District Case No. 3:18-cv-7784, 2. Public Employee Appointments a. Director of Police Accountability, b. Director of Information Technology. 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/city-council/city-council-agendas 
 
PERSONNEL BOARD at 7 pm 
Videoconference: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87659944705?pwd=ck5ZRkZYRXlwdDdwOStwSGlFelc3Zz09 
Teleconference: 1-669-900-9128 Meeting ID: 576 5994 4705 Passcode: 87625 
AGENDA: All salary ranges are annual – VI. Recommendation to revise the classification and salary range ($110,780.76 to $133,952.04) of Disability Services Specialist to ADA Program Coordinator, VII. Recommendation to revise the classification and salary range ($166,896 to $204,912) of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer, VIII. Recommendation to establish the classification and salary range ($137,966.40 to $181,292.76) of Assistant to the City Attorney, IX. Recommendation to revise the Deputy City Attorney I-III Classification and establish Deputy City Attorney IV Classification and Salary Range, ($191,236.44 to $235,123.20), X. Recommendation to expand the Program Manager Series base range ($94,657.32 to $112,367.88) by establishing the Principal Program Manager classification and salary range ($151,819.20 to $183,718.85). 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/boards-commissions/personnel-board 
 
Wednesday, September 7, 2022 
 
 
IKE Smart City Kiosk Phase II at 2 pm 
Videoconference: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89186865266?pwd=R2VxSlZzL2FNRDNSd0dXNlEwMkdkdz09 
AGENDA: Round 2 Location Community meeting Gilman District 
https://www.visitberkeley.com/plan-your-trip/ike-kiosks/ 
 
BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES at 6:30 pm 
Videoconference: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_3yJHTmTMSUmywstW8mYuKg?_x_zm_rtaid=WYCllGN5QVaPE_l85pMVSg 
Teleconference: 1-669-900-9128 Meeting ID: 860 4230 6505 
AGENDA: Consent item C. approve preparing for 20th Annual Authors Dinner Event on March 4, 2023, D. Purchase Order for $75,000 for vehicle, Action: A. Circulation Policy Update on reducing limitations on tool lending library, eliminating fines, simplifying tool lending periods, B. Bylaws update. 
https://www.berkeleypubliclibrary.org/about/board-library-trustees 
 
COMMISSION ON DISABILITY at 6 pm 
Videoconference: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85490170295?pwd=RDhBWDdVSUY5RzZQYXhkUTkyUk90Zz09 
Teleconference: 1-699-900-9128 Meeting ID: 854 9017 0295 
AGENDA: No action items, items for discussion 1. Inclusive Disaster Registry, 2. Accessibility of Voicemail system, 3. Public participation, 4. Berkeley Bike Plan, 5. Data, Outreach & Access to City of Berkeley Programs and Services. 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/boards-commissions/commission-disability 
 
HOMELESS SERVICES PANEL OF EXPERTS at 7 pm 
Videoconference: https://zoom.us/j/92491365323 
Teleconference: 1-669-900-6833 Meeting ID: 924 9136 5323 
AGENDA: 7. Progressive real estate transfer tax reform proposal to amend Measure P, 8.9. Letter of support for allocation of Measure P monies towards development of supportive housing at 1367 University, 10. Discussion and possible action of site visit to STAIR/Pathways. 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/boards-commissions/homeless-services-panel-experts 
 
PLANNING COMMISSION at 7 pm 
Videoconference: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/83514287347 
Teleconference: 1-669-900-6833 Meeting ID: 835 1428 7347 
AGENDA: one action item 9. Public Hearing: Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) Housing element Update Project (packet 589 pages includes the DEIR) 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/boards-commissions/planning-commission 
 
Community Catalysts for Local Control at 5 pm 
Go to website to register: https://catalystsca.org/activities/townhall-2022/ 
AGENDA: Housing Solutions and California’s Failed Policies with Bob Silvestri 
The Town Hall series is recorded and available at https://catalystsca.org/activities/townhall-2022/ 
 
Thursday, September 8, 2022 
 
LEAGUE of WOMEN VOTERS CANDIDATE FORUMS 
Berkeley City Council District 8 at 5 pm 
Berkeley City Council District 1 at 6:30 pm 
Use website to register for videoconference and submit questions 
https://www.lwvbae.org/league-news/all-candidate-forums/ 
 
LOAN ADMINISTRATION BOARD at 12 pm 
Videoconference: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83730465774?pwd=TEpQT1NjalZJME5RZDA5YjdGWjFGdz09 
Teleconference: 1-669-900-9128 Meeting ID: 837 3046 5774 
AGENDA: B) Program Review a. 11 active loans for $520,000, b. $294,000 in funding available for lending and admin costs, c. Working Solutions CDFI under contract for loan servicing and technical assistance, C) Action Items i) Receive a request from the California Jazz Conservancy to modify guarantors of loan #0477 ii) Declare loan #480 to Kidventurez as Default an authorize recovery against collateral, iii) Consider resuming loan repayment requirements for RLF loan recipients. 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/boards-commissions/loan-administration-board 
 
FAIR CAMPAIGN PRACTICES (FCPC) and OPEN GOVERNMENT COMMISSION (OGC) at 6 pm 
Videoconference: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82004135411 
Teleconference: 1-669-900-6833 Meeting ID: 820 0413 5411 
AGENDA: packet is 233 pages 6. FCPC report from office holder accounts (pages 8 – 82), 7. Review of contribution limits (pages 83 – 104), 9. Presentation: Due Process in FCPC and OGC Quasi-Judicial Proceedings, 10. Informational items Berkeley Election Reform Act – A Guide to Navigating Local Election Rules (pages 104 – 135), 11. Matching funds disbursed (page 136), 12. Certification of Public Financing Program Participants (pages 137 – 233) 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/boards-commissions/fair-campaign-practices-commission 
 
ZONING ADJUSTMENTS BOARD 
Videoconference: not provided CHECK for ZOOM LATER use website link 
Teleconference: Meeting ID:  
AGENDA: on consent 
2377 Oregon – on consent – demolish single family dwelling and construct new 2614 sq ft 2-story single family dwelling with one off-street parking space on non-conforming lot 
2390 Fourth Street – on consent – all existing full-service restaurant to serve beer and wine 
742 Graysonon consentdemolish two non-residential buildings on 2.5 acre industrial site and construct a research and development (R&D) and manufacturing building consisting of approx. 213,000 sq ft of gross floor area and a parking garage with 325 spaces 
1151 Grizzly Peak – staff recommend approve – legalize one accessory building in the rear setback on single-family lot 
2136 San Pablo – new public hearing – DEIR scoping session (comments dues 9/16/2022 by 5 pm) and project preview – demolish existing 9281 sq ft 1-story non-residential building and construct new 123 unit 6-story mixed-use with 3-live/work and parking garage with 50 off-street auto parking spaces on ground floor, density bonus project with 10 units to very low income households. 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/boards-commissions/zoning-adjustments-board 
 
Webinar: How Environmental Toxicity, Inequity and Capitalism Affect Reproductive Health at 10 am (webinar is free)  
Register: https://bit.ly/3A3Ev8o 
AGENDA: will unveil a new report written by the Center called “The Influence of Environmental Toxicity, Inequity and Capitalism on Reproductive Health”. The report describes the reproductive harm caused by fossil fuel extraction, plastic products, industrial agriculture, and climate change. The webinar will discuss these topics along with case studies and solutions.  
Sponsored by Center for Biological Diversity https://www.biologicaldiversity.org/ 
 
Friday, September 9, 2022 – no meetings found 
 
Saturday, September 10, 2022 
BERKELEY NEIGHBORHOODS COUNCIL at 10 am 
Videoconference: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/85935407339?pwd=S1VmYkhzOTkxVkJNaXNlOXpVK3dLQT09 
Teleconference: 1-669-444-9171 Meeting ID: 859 3540 7339 Passcode: 349962 
AGENDA: Election Forum – BUSD School Board, 10 am introductions, 10:10 – 10:30 Candidate statements (Ka’Dojah Brown, Mike Chang, Norma J F Harrison, Reichi Lee, Tatiana Guerreiro Ramos, Jennifer Shanoski), 10:30 – 12 noon Questions for the Candidates. 
Co-sponsored with BCA 
https://berkeleyneighborhoodscouncil.com/ 
 
SOLANO STROLL-ISH 10 am – 5 pm 
A sidewalk event with activities, entertainment – (the mini stroll – no booths) 
https://www.solanoavenueassn.org/events/solano-avenue-stroll/ 
 
Sunday, September 11, 2022  
SOLANO STROLL 10 am – 5 pm,  
A closed street event with booths, food, entertainment, crafters (the big event) 
https://www.solanoavenueassn.org/events/solano-avenue-stroll/ 
 
++++++++++++++++++++ 
Tuesday, September 6, 2022 
AGENDA and RULES COMMITTEE at 2:30 pm 
CITY COUNCIL DRAFT AGENDA for SEPTEMBER 20, 2022 
Videoconference: https://cityofberkeley-info.zoomgov.com/j/1601730715 
Teleconference: 1-669-254-5252 or 1-833-568-8864 (toll free) Meeting ID: 160 173 0715 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/city-council/council-committees/policy-committee-agenda-rules 
AGENDA CONSENT: 

  1. Resolution Local Emergency Due to COVID-19
  2. City Legislative Bodies to continue to meet via videoconference
  3. Establish the 2023 Council meeting schedule with starting time 6 pm
  4. 2023 Tax Rate: Transportation Network Company User Tax (lyft, Uber, etc.) for trips originating in CoB $0.53885 single rider, $0.26249 per person pooled trip
  5. Amend Contract No. 084349-1 add $45,000 total $261,282 with AMCS Inc for Zero Wste PC Software Maintenance and Professional Services and extend from 7/1/2022 thru 6/31/2025 (June has only 30 days),
  6. Purchase Order using General Services Administration for $250,000 for vehicles – the type of vehicles or whether combustion engine or EV to be purchased is not specified
  7. Amend Contract No. 105921-1 add $195,000 total $1,047,200 with TruPoint Solutions LLC for Accela professional services and extend 2 years 6/1/2015 to 6/30/2024,
  8. Contract $714,022 with SCS Engineers to provide engineering, maintenance, and monitoring services for the landfill to meet mandatory compliance requirements at Cesar Chavez Park from 1/1/2023 – 6/30/2026
  9. Contracts on-call arborist services $125,000 Davey Resource Group, Inc, HortScience Bartlett Consulting $125,000 11/1/2022 – 12/31/2025
  10. Contracts on-call engineering services total $6,900,000, 1. CSW Stuber-Stroeh Engineering Group, Inc $750,000, 2. HDR Engineering, Inc. $750,000, 3. LCC Engineering & Surveying, Inc $1,500,000, 4. Mark Thomas & Company, Inc $750,000, 5. Park Engineering, Inc $1,500,000, 6. Pavement Engineering Inc $1,500,000, 7. SCI Consulting Group $150,000
  11. Amend Contract No. 10350 (112199-1) add $100,000 total $250,000 with Technology, Engineering, and Construction, Inc for tank maintenance and certification services and extend to 6/30/2024,
  12. Amend Contract No. 31900085 add $45,000 total $231,472 with Syntech Systems, Inc for service and support of infrastructure and software for City’s Fleet Fueling Program,
  13. Contract $177,218.68 includes contingency $23,115 with Shaw Industries for Civic Center Building Replacement Project,

ACTION: 

  1. CM & Jordan Klein – Zoning Ordinance Amendments Making Technical Edits and Corrections includes, zoning districts, C-C, C-e, C-NS, C-DMU, Protected Uses, Setbacks, Usable Open Space, Required Parking Spaces, Design Review,
  2. Hahn co-sponsors Taplin, Bartlett – Restoring and Improving Access to City of Berkeley Website and Archival Materials,
  3. CM & Lisa Warhuus – Extending Community Agency for 1 year at existing levels and postponing RFP process until FY 2024,
  4. Arreguin co-sponsors Bartlett, Hahn, Taplin – refer to city attorney and CM to draft ordinance on apprenticeship training standards (HARD HAT ORDINANCE)

Information Reports: 

  1. Audit status Report Response: Code Enforcement Resources Significantly Constrained and Improvements Needed in Case Management and Oversight
  2. Update on the Implementation of Fair and Impartial Policing Task Force Recommendations.

 
++++++++++++++++ 
 
SEPTEMBER 13, 2022 CITY COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING at 6 pm 
Videoconference: https://cityofberkeley-info.zoomgov.com/j/1611765730 
Teleconference: 1-669-254-5252 or 1-833-568-8864 (toll free) Meeting ID: 161 176 5730 
https://berkeleyca.gov/your-government/city-council/city-council-agendas 
AGENDA CONSENT:  

  1. Amend Contract 084534-1 add $188,955 total $1,008,291.20 and extend from 9/30/2010 to 6/30/2024 with NextGen Helathcare Information Systems, Inc
  2. Amend Contract 31900288 add $122,000 total $606,800 and extend to 6/30/2023 with Disability Access Consultants for ADA Transition Plan
  3. Contract 32100194 add $260,000 total $4,556,733 with Bay Cities Paving & Grading, Inc for Street Rehabilitation FY 2021 Project
  4. Minutes
  5. Contract $87,675 with Municipal Resource Group for addressing impacts resulting from the Great Resignation
  6. Amend Contract add $8000 total $228,000 and extend to 9/14/2023 with Orsolya Kuti, DVM for on-site veterinary services for Berkeley Animal Care Services,
  7. Formal Bid Solicitation and RFP $440,000,
  8. Request for Proposal for Project Homekey consider a reservation of up to $8.5 million in general funds collected pursuant to Measure P and/or other funding
  9. Contract $120,000 for 10/1/2023 to 5/30/2023 with Tiana Sanchez International LLC for HHCS Equity Consulting services,
  10. Amend Contract add $57,100 total $220,628 with Kings View Professional Services to provide mental health Financial reporting services thru 6/30/2024,
  11. Submit grant agreements for $912,213 for Future of Public Health program for FY 2023,
  12. Donation of Painting Services from MB Jessee Painting, Inc for interior areas of 1900 6th Street estimated value $8,994,
  13. Amend Contract add 3 years 6/1/2022-6/30/2025 at decreased annual rate of $570,000 total $7,393,611 with Innovative Claim Solutions (ICS) for claims administration of the City’s Workers’ Compensation Program,
  14. Contract $71,481 total $236,305 9/29/2022 – 9/28/2023 with AHEAD, Onc using California Department of General Services (CGS) for Varonis software licenses and professional services,
  15. Lease Agreement 80 (North Building) 82/84 & 90 Bolivar Drive in Aquatic Park with Waterside Workshops for 11/1/2022 – 11/1/2031
  16. Donation $3400 for Memorial Bench at Cesar Chavez Park in memory of Walt and Trudee Rowson,
  17. Donation $3400 for Memorial Bench at Cesar Chavez Park in memory of Don Rothenberg,
  18. Donation $3400 for Memorial Bench at Indian Rock Park in memory of Dave Altman,
  19. Contract $480,000 with 14.58% contingency of $70,000 total $550,000 with Bellingham, Inc to replace and repair docks at the Berkeley Marina,
  20. Revenue Grant $180,000 from California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) for 2023 Selective Enforcement Program (STEP) for 10/1/2022 – 9/30/2023
  21. 2022 Vision Zero Program (Berkeley Bicycle and Pedestrian Plans) Grant Applications authorizes CM to submit grant application to federal Safe Streets and Roads for All (SS4A),
  22. Disaster and Fire Safety Commission –Red Curbs and Visible Signage, request for immediate remedial action to improve evacuation, replace signage as necessary and red curb fire hydrant areas and pinch points
  23. Mental Health Commission – Appoint Judy Appel to Mental Health Commission,
  24. Peace and Justice Commission – Adopt Resolution on Berkeley’s Commitment to Abortion Access
  25. Arreguin, co-sponsors Robinson, Hahn – $1000 Expenditure Amount for Pacific Center for Human Growth,
  26. Arreguin, co-sponsor Hahn – Correction to COVID-19 Emergency Response Ordinance BMC 13.110 Ordinance 7,762-N.S. relates to tenant protections
  27. Taplin – Resolution in Support of High-Quality, Equitable Healthcare Services at UCSF,
  28. Taplin – Berkeley Youth Alternative (BYA) Charity Golf Classic,
  29. Taplin, co-sponsors Droste, Wengraf, Kesarwani – California Marriage Equality Resolution (repeal Prop 8)
  30. Robinson, co-sponsors Taplin, Arreguin, Harrison – Keep Innovation in Berkeley refer to CM and Planning Commission to return to council Zoning Ordinance amendments, codified performance standards and other actions to encourage growth and retention of R & D,
  31. Robinson & Bartlett – Relinquishment of up to $500 for Center for Independent Living’s 50th Anniversary,

ACTION: 

  1. Surveillance Technology Report, Surveillance Acquisition Report and Automatic License Plate Readers,
  2. An Ordinance Repealing chapter BMC 12.76 and repealing ordinance 7643-N.S.– relates to campers, house cars, parking,
  3. Taplin – Equitable Safe Streets and Climate Justice Resolution – Resolution committing to expenditure of City and state/federal matching/recurring funds on city-maintained roads, sidewalks and bike lanes to accelerate safety improvements,
  4. Taplin, co-sponsor Robinson – Efficiency Unit Ordinance Reviewed by Land Use – Refer to City Manager and Planning Commission to adopt objective standards for Efficiency Unit Ordinance,

INFORMATION REPORTS 

  1. Council Shot Term Referral Process – Quarterly Update,
  2. Federal Economic Relief Spending
  3. Sanctuary City Contracting Compliance Report FY 2022
  4. Environment and Climate Commission 2022 Work Plan
  5. Planning Commission FY 2022-23 Work Plan

 
+++++++++++++++++++ 
 
LAND USE CALENDAR: 
Public Hearing to be scheduled 
1201 – 1205 San Pablo (construct mixed-use building) 9/29/2022 
2018 Blake (construct multi-family residential building) 10/6/2022 
1643-47 California (new basement and 2nd story) 11/3/2022 
Remanded to ZAB or LPC 
1205 Peralta – Conversion of an existing garage 
Notice of Decision (NOD) and Use Permits with the End of the Appeal Period 
Bad news on tracking approved projects in the appeal period. Samantha Updegrave, Zoning Officer, Principal Planner wrote the listing of projects in the appeal period can only be found by looking up each project individually through permits online by address or permit number https://berkeleyca.gov/sites/default/files/2022-03/Online-Building-Permits-Guide.pdf 
 
The website with easy to find listing of projects in the appeal period was left on the “cutting room floor” another casualty of the conversion to the new City of Berkeley website.  
Please ask for it to be restored. 
 
WORKSESSIONS: 
September 20 Residential Objective Standards for Middle Housing at 4 pm 
October 6 Measure O Report and Update at 4 pm (If approved this meeting will be moved to October 11, 2022) 
Unscheduled Presentations 
Civic Arts Grantmaking Process & Capital Grant Program 
Fire Facilities Study Report 
African American Holistic Resource Center (November 15) 
(removed – Cannabis Health Considerations) 
 
Kelly Hammargren’s on what happened the preceding week can be found in the Berkeley Daily Planet www.berkeleydailyplanet.com under Activist’s Diary. This meeting list is also posted at https://www.sustainableberkeleycoalition.com/whats-ahead.html on the Sustainable Berkeley Coalition website. 
If you would like to receive the Activist’s Calendar as soon as it is completed send an email to [email protected]. If you wish to stop receiving the weekly summary of city meetings please forward the weekly summary you received to [email protected] 

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