cutNscratch: Trifecta of Taubman news | Arts & Theatre | roanoke.com – Roanoke Times


Receive the latest in local entertainment news in your inbox weekly!
Betty Branch stands with the bronze sculpture “Juggler I” at the Taubman Museum of Art’s exhibit, Betty Branch, A Retrospective. The display in the background is a reproduction of a wall at her studio’s main workroom.
“The Flock,” by Steven Kenny, is the cover of the newest edition of Artemis Journal. Kenny, a renowned artist and Peekskill, New York, native, recently moved to Check, in Floyd County.
Regional culture kicked into a big gear on Friday at the Taubman Museum of Art.
The museum played host to two events in one. Roanoke’s annual Artemis Journal, devoted to Southwest Virginia artists and writers, had its launch party. “For the Love of a Book” is the theme for the 45-year-old publication’s latest iteration. The journal, developed from writing workshops for domestic violence victims in the region, this year features works that Nikki Giovanni inspired with her poem, “Fall in Love (For Artemis).”
The publication also features former U.S. Poet laureate Natasha Trethewey; Virginia poet laureates Ron Smith and Carolyn Kreiter-Foronda; and Virginia Poet Laureate Luisa Igloria. Artists and writers from Floyd County — Colleen Redman, Katherine Chantal, Starroot and Lisal Kayati — are in the pages, along with more creators from around the world, according to information that Artemis editor Jeri Rogers provided.
The Floyd-based journal donates 10% of its earnings to an abused women’s shelter in Southwest Virginia, Rogers wrote.
Giovanni retired on Thursday from Virginia Tech, where she was a distinguished professor in the English department. She read from her work during the publication’s launch party at the Taubman. She is definitely not resting, nor abandoning the region — Giovanni is scheduled to team at Jefferson Center on Sept. 23 with saxophonist Javon Jackson, for a night of music and poetry that is part of the venue’s Main Stage Jazz Series.
Another of Artemis Journal’s projects is a monthly podcast, Artemis Speaks, in which Rogers interviews artists and writers that the journal publishes. Giovanni has been among the three-year-old podcast’s subjects. So has internationally lauded artist and Roanoker Betty Branch.
The Taubman on Friday debuted a Branch-centric exhibition, what it called a comprehensive look at her expansive career, with 60 works on display, according to a news release that the museum provided. (This column’s deadline and other constraints prevented me from writing about this from the museum itself.) The Taubman gathered the works from its permanent collection, as well as from other institutions, private collections and Branch’s own holdings.
The “exhibition demonstrates her ongoing exploration of the female form, rites of passage, in-depth studio process, and celebrated public sculptures throughout the Blue Ridge and beyond,” the news release states.
Karl E. Willers, the museum’s chief curator and deputy director of collections and exhibitions, added: “Through a diversity of media including sculpture, installation, performance and poetic writings, Betty Branch has long been a leading and transformational contributor to the contemporary arts, especially in her expression of powerful images of and effective voices for women.”
You’ve probably seen Branch’s work, even if you were not aware of it. For example, she created the “Fallen Firefighter” memorial at Virginia Museum of Transportation. “A Perfect Balance,” her sculpture of two ballet dancers in a pas de deux, greets people entering Jefferson Center via its main doors. Her “Once Upon a Time” is seen at the Roanoke Public Library, downtown.
Nor is Branch slowing a decades-long career. These days, she has been busy at her studio and gallery at Roanoke’s Warehouse Row with a commission to sculp the late “Angel of Grandin,” James Tarpley, along with a set of life-size, clay, female torsos, according to the Taubman’s news release.
See the retrospective, which is free, on Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m. The museum closes at 9 p.m. on the first Friday of each month. Call 540-342-5760 for a private tour during hours the Taubman is closed.
Finally, the museum has received a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, which it says will expand outreach to individuals with diverse abilities and their families.
The $243,104 grant will fund a new program called Happy HeARTs. It will serve community members (and their families) who have such varied abilities as blindness or low vision; hearing difficulties; neurodiversities including the autism spectrum, sensory processing or learning disabilities; and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
Happy HeARTs, a free program, will provide therapeutic art techniques to help people explore their creative potential while addressing occupational skill sets and needs. In a typical session offered through Happy HeARTs, participants can take part in a gallery tour, engage in hands-on art creation, and enjoy art-inspired activities that are accessible and sensory-friendly, according to the museum.
Receive the latest in local entertainment news in your inbox weekly!
Tad Dickens is the features editor for The Roanoke Times.
{{description}}
Email notifications are only sent once a day, and only if there are new matching items.

Comic made his name doing wild and painful stunts on “Jackass.”
The Roanoke Symphony Orchestra jump starts its 70th season on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. with a free concert downtown.

Comic performs on Saturday at Jefferson Center, with Roanoke-based Melissa Douty opening.
Betty Branch stands with the bronze sculpture “Juggler I” at the Taubman Museum of Art’s exhibit, Betty Branch, A Retrospective. The display in the background is a reproduction of a wall at her studio’s main workroom.
“The Flock,” by Steven Kenny, is the cover of the newest edition of Artemis Journal. Kenny, a renowned artist and Peekskill, New York, native, recently moved to Check, in Floyd County.
Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

source


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.